New Blogs

  • 18 Jan 2018
    Last week's program was devoted to describing some of the ways that blacklight can help identify, authenticate, and provide condition details on various categories of antiques. In this week's show I'll discuss ways in which use of the blacklight must be augmented with other tools in order to better understand quality and condition. And when blacklight does help you identify a condition issue, what are some of the considerations in deciding whether to pursue a repair or restoration. Most of the program will focus on whether restoration of oil paintings might make sense for a particular work of art. Please join us this coming Sunday evening, January 21, 2018 at 5PM PST, 6PM MST, 7PM CST, 8PM EST. Gary
    4 Posted by Gary & Carol Stover
  • Last week's program was devoted to describing some of the ways that blacklight can help identify, authenticate, and provide condition details on various categories of antiques. In this week's show I'll discuss ways in which use of the blacklight must be augmented with other tools in order to better understand quality and condition. And when blacklight does help you identify a condition issue, what are some of the considerations in deciding whether to pursue a repair or restoration. Most of the program will focus on whether restoration of oil paintings might make sense for a particular work of art. Please join us this coming Sunday evening, January 21, 2018 at 5PM PST, 6PM MST, 7PM CST, 8PM EST. Gary
    Jan 18, 2018 4
  • 10 Jan 2018
    A black light can often be a usefull tool for identifying and dating antiques and works of art, and it can often help determine whether repairs have been made. In this week's show we'll look at how a black light can be used to detect repairs to porcelain, determine whether glass is period or a reproduction, date textiles, authenticate dating on cast iron and painted wood furniture, and consider ways a black light can be used to examine works of art and other works on paper. In my experience use of a black light alone is almost never enough to give you all the information you need to date and authenticate antiques, but it has often been an essential tool in aiding in that process. Please join us this coming Sunday evening, January 14, 2018 for this week's program on the Use of a Black Light for Antiques. We're on at 5PM PST, 6PM MST, 7PM CST, 8PM EST. Gary
    35 Posted by Gary & Carol Stover
  • A black light can often be a usefull tool for identifying and dating antiques and works of art, and it can often help determine whether repairs have been made. In this week's show we'll look at how a black light can be used to detect repairs to porcelain, determine whether glass is period or a reproduction, date textiles, authenticate dating on cast iron and painted wood furniture, and consider ways a black light can be used to examine works of art and other works on paper. In my experience use of a black light alone is almost never enough to give you all the information you need to date and authenticate antiques, but it has often been an essential tool in aiding in that process. Please join us this coming Sunday evening, January 14, 2018 for this week's program on the Use of a Black Light for Antiques. We're on at 5PM PST, 6PM MST, 7PM CST, 8PM EST. Gary
    Jan 10, 2018 35
  • 06 Jan 2018
    2018 American Indian Arts Exposition If you plan to be in Tucson, AZ during the 2018 Tucson Gem, Mineral, Fossil, Bead and Jewelry Show (January 19 through February 14), don’t miss the American Indian Arts Exposition (held January 28 through February 11). It’s one of the roughly 45 individual shows held each year as part of the Tucson Gem Show. What makes it so special is the opportunity to see the authentic arts and crafts practiced by Native Americans representing a time span of 10,000 years representing many nations in one spot! The Indian Arts Expo features 40 individual Native American artists selling baskets, blankets, pottery and Hopi kachinas and, of course, all kinds of jewelry. The featured artists will be demonstrating T/O basket making, the art of making custom jewelry, Hopi crafts, and beadwork. It’s being held at the Quality Inn Hotel, 1300 N. Stone Avenue, Tucson, AZ. Their artists and demonstrations change every 3 days so definitely plan to go more than once. Prices range from $5 and go up to several thousand so there is something for everyone.
    26 Posted by Betty Jean Shearin
  • 2018 American Indian Arts Exposition If you plan to be in Tucson, AZ during the 2018 Tucson Gem, Mineral, Fossil, Bead and Jewelry Show (January 19 through February 14), don’t miss the American Indian Arts Exposition (held January 28 through February 11). It’s one of the roughly 45 individual shows held each year as part of the Tucson Gem Show. What makes it so special is the opportunity to see the authentic arts and crafts practiced by Native Americans representing a time span of 10,000 years representing many nations in one spot! The Indian Arts Expo features 40 individual Native American artists selling baskets, blankets, pottery and Hopi kachinas and, of course, all kinds of jewelry. The featured artists will be demonstrating T/O basket making, the art of making custom jewelry, Hopi crafts, and beadwork. It’s being held at the Quality Inn Hotel, 1300 N. Stone Avenue, Tucson, AZ. Their artists and demonstrations change every 3 days so definitely plan to go more than once. Prices range from $5 and go up to several thousand so there is something for everyone.
    Jan 06, 2018 26
  • 03 Jan 2018
    Our first Bargain Show of the new year features antiques and vintage pieces that would be buys for dealers (who normally need to buy at about 35% of what they list merchandise for for resale). An antique brass box, an antique scales, a traveling desk dated 1888, rare railroadiana, and much more---all priced at under $100, most substantially under! If you've liked my Facebook page, then your in our monthly drawing for the item I pick as the best buy. (If you're not entered, it's easy to sign up). Last month's lucky winner received a brass and wood foot warmer, English c.1850. It would normally retail at about $150. Please tune in this coming Sunday evening, January 6, 2018, at the usual time: 5PM PST, 6PM MST, 7PM CST, 8PM EST for this week's show, our montly Bargain Show, coming to you from the Brass Armadillo Antique Mall in Denver. Gary
    57 Posted by Gary & Carol Stover
  • Our first Bargain Show of the new year features antiques and vintage pieces that would be buys for dealers (who normally need to buy at about 35% of what they list merchandise for for resale). An antique brass box, an antique scales, a traveling desk dated 1888, rare railroadiana, and much more---all priced at under $100, most substantially under! If you've liked my Facebook page, then your in our monthly drawing for the item I pick as the best buy. (If you're not entered, it's easy to sign up). Last month's lucky winner received a brass and wood foot warmer, English c.1850. It would normally retail at about $150. Please tune in this coming Sunday evening, January 6, 2018, at the usual time: 5PM PST, 6PM MST, 7PM CST, 8PM EST for this week's show, our montly Bargain Show, coming to you from the Brass Armadillo Antique Mall in Denver. Gary
    Jan 03, 2018 57
  • 20 Dec 2017
    During our Appraisal Show a couple of weeks ago a fellow dealer at the Brass Armadillo Antique Mall in Denver asked us to appraise a picture he had bought at auction for $50. It was an original oil on canvas by renowned wildlife artist, Bonnie Marris. It depicts a wolf (or wolves) in 5 scenes. We appraised it at $10,000-15,000. Dealers who've been around for years often say that all the good stuff is gone. I'll highlight some recent examples of how that is very much not the case. Do you know Forrest Fenn? He buried a large metal box full of gold in the Rocky Mountains 7 years ago and wrote a poem full of clues to help guide the intrepid to its whereabouts. That Sunken Treasure is still out there waiting to be found, and so are a lot of other hidden gems, like the Bonnie Marris painting. Please join us this coming Sunday, Christmas Eve, for this week's program on finding Sunken Treasure. (By the way, there's a section in our Blogs entitled, Sunken Treasure. If you've got a story, please share it with us.) We're on at 5PM PST, 6PM MST, 7PM CST, 8PM EST. Happy Holidays! Gary
    71 Posted by Gary & Carol Stover
  • During our Appraisal Show a couple of weeks ago a fellow dealer at the Brass Armadillo Antique Mall in Denver asked us to appraise a picture he had bought at auction for $50. It was an original oil on canvas by renowned wildlife artist, Bonnie Marris. It depicts a wolf (or wolves) in 5 scenes. We appraised it at $10,000-15,000. Dealers who've been around for years often say that all the good stuff is gone. I'll highlight some recent examples of how that is very much not the case. Do you know Forrest Fenn? He buried a large metal box full of gold in the Rocky Mountains 7 years ago and wrote a poem full of clues to help guide the intrepid to its whereabouts. That Sunken Treasure is still out there waiting to be found, and so are a lot of other hidden gems, like the Bonnie Marris painting. Please join us this coming Sunday, Christmas Eve, for this week's program on finding Sunken Treasure. (By the way, there's a section in our Blogs entitled, Sunken Treasure. If you've got a story, please share it with us.) We're on at 5PM PST, 6PM MST, 7PM CST, 8PM EST. Happy Holidays! Gary
    Dec 20, 2017 71
  • 13 Dec 2017
    If you missed our Appraisal Show on Saturday, which was aired live on Facebook, please check out the video of it in the Archives section or on Youtube. We had some extraordinary items in for appraisal, one of which, a 6th century B.C. bronze Etruscan statue of the goddess Menvra, inspired this week's show on Forensics for Antiques. That statue could be authenticated by using a technique called thermoluminescence dating. You're probably more familiar with carbon 14 dating, but that requires working with an organic material, and the process can be invasive. For thermoluminescence to be effective, the item must have been buried for centuries, as this statue was. It is often used to date ancient pottery. What is new is that many forensic tests that were formally too expensive for most individuals to use are now available at much lower cost. I've had forensic tests performed on 2 of my antiques in the past year: a pigment test on a painting done by a Denver lab and a facial recognition analysis done on a 19th century photograph. Both tests were done for only a few hundred dollars. I'll describe how these and other forensic tests are done (by professionals in the field, not by antique dealers like me!) in this week's show, which is on at the usual time, this coming Sunday, December 17, 2017 at 5PM PST, 6PM MDT, 7PM CST, 8PM EST. Hope you can join us. Gary
    86 Posted by Gary & Carol Stover
  • If you missed our Appraisal Show on Saturday, which was aired live on Facebook, please check out the video of it in the Archives section or on Youtube. We had some extraordinary items in for appraisal, one of which, a 6th century B.C. bronze Etruscan statue of the goddess Menvra, inspired this week's show on Forensics for Antiques. That statue could be authenticated by using a technique called thermoluminescence dating. You're probably more familiar with carbon 14 dating, but that requires working with an organic material, and the process can be invasive. For thermoluminescence to be effective, the item must have been buried for centuries, as this statue was. It is often used to date ancient pottery. What is new is that many forensic tests that were formally too expensive for most individuals to use are now available at much lower cost. I've had forensic tests performed on 2 of my antiques in the past year: a pigment test on a painting done by a Denver lab and a facial recognition analysis done on a 19th century photograph. Both tests were done for only a few hundred dollars. I'll describe how these and other forensic tests are done (by professionals in the field, not by antique dealers like me!) in this week's show, which is on at the usual time, this coming Sunday, December 17, 2017 at 5PM PST, 6PM MDT, 7PM CST, 8PM EST. Hope you can join us. Gary
    Dec 13, 2017 86

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